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Charlie's Apple Equivalents

A 2-page public domain document designed for printing on a single sheet of paper.
This took 3 weeks to research and compile. Published by Charlie Duane in 2005.

right click to download .doc file

online version below:

Glycemic Load Equivalents of an Apple

You can maintain stable blood sugar levels by controlling how much and how often you eat the "apple equivalents" listed on the reverse side of this paper.

The ordinary person can eat 2 apples without causing a dramatic increase in blood sugar levels. Two hours later, that same person can eat 2 more apples and still maintain stable blood sugar levels.

However, eating 3 apples all at once places a higher "glycemic load" on the body's system than the 4 apples eaten in two sittings two hours apart. The idea is to keep the "weight" of the glycemic load at a modest level during any two-hour period.

All the foods listed on the reverse side of this page have the same glycemic load as one apple. You can use the list as a dietary tool to mix and match quantities of food, in order to manage your blood sugar levels for the next two hours.

Foods like meat, fish, eggs, nuts, and olive oil are not listed because they hardly raise blood sugar levels at all, and they can be eaten together with the "apple equivalents" in moderation.

This page provides a useful tool for almost any nourishing dietary plan. It is not a diet. Rather, it provides vital information in a rule-of-thumb format that you can easily use.

For example, the list tells you that a breakfast consisting of an omelette with two pieces of fruit will have a dramatically lower glycemic load than a breakfast consisting of two English Muffins with jelly and a glass of juice.

For another example, you can eat almost limitless amounts of broccoli or spinach without raising your blood sugar very much. But drinking quantities of soda and juice, or plates of pasta and rice, will. This insight suggests food choices for dealing with hunger.

The presented information comes from my personal research and computations. Sources include the USDA database, flood labels, and the Glycemic Index. The concept of adjusting portions to the same glycemic load as an apple is my intellectual property.

This idea should be shared freely. Please give copies to those you love. Faithful copies should retain my authorship and be shared on a not-for-profit basis.

by C. Duane 7-05

 

 fruit
1 apple (81 cal.)
.7 of 1 cup apple sauce (73 cal.)
.9 of 1 orange (60 cal.)
4 oz. orange juice (57 cal.)
1/2 of 1 banana (58 cal.)
2.3 peaches (98 cal.)
2.3 plums (84 cal.)
.6 of 1 cup grapes (63 cal.)
1 cup blueberries, raw (84 cal.)
3/4 cup blueberries, frozen (58 cal.)
2.2 cups strawberries, diced (108 cal.)

garden vegetables
49 cups romaine, shredded (381 cal.)
98 cups spinach, fresh (645 cal.)
10 cups broccoli, raw (240 cal.)
8 cups celery (156 cal.)
1.8 cups onions (109 cal.)
3.3 cucumbers (130 cal.)
3.3 carrots - med (87 cal.)
3.5 bell peppers (112 cal.)
4.5 tomatoes - whole (117 cal.)
2.1 cups tomato juice (89 cal.)
.6 of 1 cup tomato soup (95 cal.)


52 asparagus spears (188 cal.)
4.2 cups mushrooms (179 cal.)
5.4 cups cauliflower (155 cal.)
4.8 cups eggplant, 1-in. cubes (132 cal.)
4.5 cups broccoli, frozen, cooked (234 cal.)
4.2 cups zucchini (122 cal.)
4.2 cups kale (151 cal.)
3.7 cups yellow squash (133 cal.)
1 cup onion, cooked (98 cal.)
3 artichokes, med (170 cal.)
.4 of 1 sweet potato - med (69 cal.)
.2 of 1 baked potato, white (43 cal.)
1/3 cup instant potato, cooked (71 cal.)
4.7 cups green beans (159 cal.)
1.1 cup mung beans, cooked (235 cal.)
1 cup lentils, cooked (222 cal.)
.9 of 1 cup black beans, cooked (201 cal.)
.2 of 1 cup black beans, dry (165 cal.)

dairy
1.8 cup 1% organic milk (178 cal.)
1.8 cup cottage cheese, non-fat (285 cal.)

grains
.8 of 1 cup wheat germ, crude (322 cal.)
4.3 tbsp raw oat bran (62 cal.)
.9 of 1 cup cooked oat bran (75 cal.)
.8 of 1 cup slow-cooked oatmeal (111 cal.)
.2 of 1 cup oats, dry, rolled (114 cal.)
.8 of 1 cup oats, cooked, rolled (111 cal.)
15 gm barley, dry, rolled (36 cal.)
.3 of 1 cup barley, dry (172 cal.)
.7 of 1 cup barley, cooked (138 cal.)
.45 of 1 cup rye flakes, rolled (122 cal.)
1.6 tbsp cornmeal, dry (52 cal.)
.3 of 1 cup cornmeal, cooked (47 cal.)
.8 of 1 pc. white bread (55 cal.)
.9 of 1 pc. whole wheat bread (61 cal.)
.9 of 1 pc. pita pocket, 4-in wholewheat (67 cal.)
1 pc. 7-grain bread, wholefoods (83 cal.)
1.2 pc. Ezekiel bread (99 cal.)
3.2 tbsp Muesli, cereal (67 cal.)
1/3 of 1 cup Corn Flakes, cereal (32 cal.)
3/8 cup Total, cereal (46 cal.)
1 oz. noodles, buckwheat,dry,Soba(96 cal.)
.8 of 1 oz. linguine, dry, Barilla (83 cal.)
.6 of 1 oz. corn pasta, dry (1/6 cup) (60 cal.)
1/3 of 1 cup brown rice, cooked (71 cal.)
1/5 of 1 cup white rice, cooked (43 cal.)

snacks
3.4 oz. Coca-Cola (43 cal.)
4.9 oz. Fanta (74 cal.)
4.4 oz. Gatorade (27 cal.)
2.3 tsp honey, raw (47 cal.)
2.4 tsp table sugar (39 cal.)
9 tsp fructose (135 cal.)
~1/2 of 1 Hershey goodbar-med 2.6-oz.(180 cal)
1/4 of 1 Pop Tart - frosted choc. (54 cal.)
.9 of 1 Twix cookie (123 cal.)
1/3 of 1 Snickers - 2-oz. (48 cal.)
2/3 of 1 granola bar - 1-oz (90 cal.)
.3 of 1 Power bar (70 cal.)
10 pcs. Skittles (transfat) (44 cal.)
1/2 of 1 doughnut, glazed- sm, 1.5-oz (85 cal.)
2/3 of a half English muffin (2 half-parts) (45 cal.)
1 scoop ice cream, premium (184 cal.)
3/4 of 1 scoop ice cream, regular (97 cal.)
.4 of 1 oat bran muffin, sm. (70 cal.)
3/4 of 1 pc. pancake from mix, 4-in. (54 cal.)
.6 of 1 slice pizza - thin (78 cal.)